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The champions -- 1930

Jan. 28, 2011
 
Front row (left to right): James Bowdoin (32); Ken Radick (35); Wuert Engelmann (33); Hurdis McCrary (28); Joseph (Red) Dunn (17); Dave Zuidmulder; Merle Zuver (14); Paul Fitzgibbons (18); Arnie Herber (12); Dick O’Donnell (30); Carl (Cully) Lidberg (38). Back row: Bernard (Boob) Darling (29); Howard (Whitey) Woodin (23); Bo Molenda (27); Claude Perry (26); Tom Nash (37); LaVern (Lavvie) Dilweg (22); Robert (Cal) Hubbard (40); Elmer Sleight (34); Verne Lewellen (31); Johnny (Blood) McNally (24); Francis (Jug) Earpe (39); August (Mike) Michalske (36); Curly Lambeau (20). Otto Stiller photo from Press-Gazette archives
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Curly Lambeau was never one to stand pat, even after a championship season.

When the difference between first and second place can be as little as a missed field goal or a dropped pass, Lambeau took steps to ensure he was fielding the best team he possibly could. Ten of the 28 players who had taken Green Bay to the top in 1929 were released and 11 newcomers stood ready to fill their shoes.

The turnover, while large, involved mainly lesser used players. The only notable departure was Lambeau himself, who left the playing field to concentrate on coaching.

Lambeau’s offense didn’t need much tuning. The Packers exploded for 234 points, second best in the league behind the Giants, and threw a league-high 17 touchdown passes. While Green Bay continued to rely heavily on the pass as it had done in the past, Verne Lewellen (eight rushing touchdowns), Hurdis McCrary (4) and Bo Molenda (3) spearheaded a solid ground attack.

As had been the case in 1929, the team to beat was the Giants. Green Bay and New York met twice in the 1930. The Packers hosted the first meeting in early October. There, Johnny (Blood) McNally hauled in the deciding score on a 55-yard touchdown pass from Joseph (Red) Dunn to clinch a 14-7 win.

Seven weeks later, the two teams again locked horns. Green Bay fell behind 13-0 before Lewellen’s touchdown run pulled the Packers to 13-7. Molenda followed suit late in the fourth quarter for an apparent tie, but the officials disallowed the score.

Not only did the Packers lose the game 13-7, they also lost their slim lead over the Giants in the standings.

With four games remaining, Green Bay knocked off Frankford while Staten Island aided the Packers’ cause by edging the Giants. In the way of thanks, Green Bay turned around and clobbered Staten Island 37-7. Meanwhile, the Giants lost again. When the season came to a close two weeks later, Green Bay (10-3-1) had edged New York (13-4-0) by .004 of a percen

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