Advertisement

You will be redirected to the page you want to view in  seconds.

For area teachers, Super Bowl is a super chance for learning fun

Feb. 3, 2011
 
Third grade student Austin Dolphin throws a football during gym class, with a Packers Super Bowl theme, at Webster Elementary School in Allouez, Monday, January 31, 2011.
Third grade student Austin Dolphin throws a football during gym class, with a Packers Super Bowl theme, at Webster Elementary School in Allouez, Monday, January 31, 2011. / H. Marc Larson/Press-Gazette

“SOUPER BOWL”

Some area schools have used the Super Bowl as an opportunity to raise funds for families in need.

They include: Bay Harbor Elementary School in Howard-Suamico, which collected cans of soup for a local food pantry. Students will celebrate a so-called Souper Bowl today with special musical guest Randy Stary performing a song he wrote for the Green Bay Packers: Rock to the Big Game 2011.

Students at Meadowbrook Elementary School in Howard-Suamico formed into a “green” team and a “gold/yellow” team to compete to collect cans of soup, which will be donated to a local food pantry. The team who collects the most will be the “Souper” Bowl winner.

Students at Green Bay’s Webster Elementary School have collected almost 1,000 items for a Super Food Drive for Paul’s Pantry.

More

As the minutes to Sunday’s Super Bowl kickoff count down, local educators say they’re embracing the football frenzy — and hopefully teaching kids a lesson or two along the way.

Schools from throughout the Green Bay area are hosting everything from tailgate parties to pep rallies, and teachers are framing lessons around the Green Bay Packers’ trip to the big game.

Students at Green Bay’s Webster Elementary School are participating in a mock mini-camp that allows them to throw footballs or knock down bowling pins dressed in Pittsburgh Steelers’ black and yellow.

“The kids are really rising to it,” principal Nancy Schultz said. “Everyone is very excited.”

She said educators came up with ways to incorporate Super Bowl excitement into daily activities.

Patrick Wallace, a teacher at Aldo Leopold Community School, hooked up two sixth-grade reading classes with counterparts in the Pittsburgh area.

Green Bay students will connect with the students via Skype or e-mail today he said. The idea is to learn more about their respective cities and to share reading projects, he said.

“The winners will send each other books about the Packers or about the Steelers or Pittsburgh,” Wallace said. “It’s about the kids gaining knowledge. The Super Bowl kind of introduces them, but it’s something we hope to keep going. I hope these relationships continue long after the game is over.”

He said excitement about the Super Bowl grows each school day as the big game draws closer.

“These kids are excited more than you can imagine,” Wallace said. “We talk about it every day. They’re at that age where they’re always going to remember how old they were when the Packers went to the Super Bowl.”

But he said it hasn’t kept them from hitting the books.

“Activities like the reading program help,” he said. “It hasn’t overtaken the focus of academics.”

Some teachers have planned fun activities outside of classes.

Cynthia Hoeft’s third-grade class at King Elementary School will host a tailgating party today over the lunch hour, listening to music and showing support for their favorite team. Instead of going to the lunchroom, each student is bringing in food or supplies, such as buns, chips, condiments and cookies, and she will provide hamburgers, brats and hot dogs.

“The kids definitely are excited,” Hoeft said.

Green Bay’s Preble High School is having a Super Bowl Math Trivia contest. Each day on the Jumbo-tron there is a math trivia question that relate to the Packers or the Super Bowl. Students work on the problems each day, and will submit their answers to the math department today.

At Lombardi Middle School, students and staff get to decide what Vince Lombardi is thinking and post it on the photo of the legendary coach located in the school foyer. One example: “Beating the Steelers isn’t everything … it’s the only thing.”

Forest Glen Elementary School in the Howard-Suamico School District, like many other schools, has a pep rally planned today.

Other local classrooms have connected with counterparts in the Pittsburgh area for friendly rivalry and fun.

Some sixth-graders at Green Bay’s Washington Middle School are competing against a Pennsylvania class by collecting canned goods to be donated to local food panties for a “Souper Bowl” competition.

Green Bay’s Franklin Middle School has a wager with Pittsburgh’s Allegheny Middle School in which the losing team’s school will send a book about their city to be included in the other school’s library. The principal from the losing school also will wear clothing from the winning team later in the month.

If the Packers win, the principals also will wear Cheeseheads provided by Franklin Middle School staff.

Green Bay school counselor Chrystal Sutrick said students are ready for Sunday.

“They’re definitely excited,” she said. “But teachers are doing a good job of keeping them on task. At Kennedy, for instance, students have a football and a helmet and they write their goals and accomplishments. This is going with their excitement, but also doing school activities.”

Insiders Blog


What's your take on the Packers Family Night change?

Retrieving results.
Watching practice is fine.(Your vote)
15%
576 votes
I'd rather watch a scrimmage.(Your vote)
23%
856 votes
I don't want to pay to watch practice.(Your vote)
27%
1018 votes
It doesn't matter to me.(Your vote)
34%
1272 votes

Catch up on the latest in our pregame show every game day.

Football fans

If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

Special Reports

ORDER YOURS

Football fans

If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

Special Reports