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Green Bay Packers' success helps wrestling belt maker

7:09 AM, Jun. 27, 2011
Green Bay Packers Aaron Rodgers, right, holds the Vince Lombardi Trophy as he and teammate Clay Matthews celebrate after beating the Pittsburgh Steelers 31-25 in the NFL Super Bowl XLV football game Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Green Bay Packers Aaron Rodgers, right, holds the Vince Lombardi Trophy as he and teammate Clay Matthews celebrate after beating the Pittsburgh Steelers 31-25 in the NFL Super Bowl XLV football game Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
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Championship wrestling belts aren't expected to become a fashion trend.

But their exposure - first in pantomime by Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers and then on full display by Rodgers and teammate Clay Matthews on a podium after the Super Bowl - have spiked some sales and helped professional wrestling creep into mainstream sports.

"Teenagers and adults want something to remind them of champions," said Steve Sandberg, chief executive officer of Wrestling Super Store, the Tampa, Fla.-based company that produced the belt on Rodgers' shoulder after the Packers' win over the ...

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If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

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