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Jennings likely to miss 3 to 6 weeks for surgery

Oct. 25, 2012
 
Green Bay Packers receiver Greg Jennings (85) celebrates his second quarter touchdown against the New Orleans Saints during Sunday's game at Lambeau Field. Evan Siegle/Press-Gazette
Green Bay Packers receiver Greg Jennings (85) celebrates his second quarter touchdown against the New Orleans Saints during Sunday's game at Lambeau Field. Evan Siegle/Press-Gazette

Greg Jennings will undergo surgery to repair an abdominal tear on Tuesday and likely is looking at a three- to six-week recovery.

The Packers receiver has missed the last three games and four of the last five because of a groin/abdomen strain. He visited a specialist this week, Dr. William Meyers in Philadelphia, and was diagnosed with an abdominal rectus tear.

“The way he described it to me was simply two people pulling on the end of a rope,” Jennings said today, “and it starts to fray and the more tugging, the more fraying, which means the more tearing occurs.”

Jennings wouldn’t share his expected recovery time, but for pro athletes it’s generally three to six weeks, which means barring complications Jennings will be back this season.

Jennings has been doing strictly rehabilitation on the injury the past three weeks. He said that between now and the surgery he has to get himself into the best cardiovascular shape he can to speed his recovery from what he said will be a 25-minute, outpatient procedure.

“That’s the No. 1 thing that’s going to take the longest when it comes to me being physically active is how much I can endure and my stamina and different things like that,” Jennings said. “Just trying to do different pool works, swimming, whatever it is that doesn’t over-exhaust the tear, but definitely works it. I can make it worse, but the surgery will fix it no matter how bad it gets.”

Jennings said Meyers gave him one other options than surgery: taking an injection that might have helped him get through the season.

"There was still no guarantee I could go out there and hit that last gear," Jennings said, "and that’s the one thing I have to have, is actually trying to create more separation than I would be able to create. So, there’s no sense to me in taking a shot that may or may not work, may take three-days-to-a-week to actually start to work. I could have spent the week rehabbing on a surgery that’s going to get me back perfect."

Jennings said he decided to see a specialist after he tried to run off the field last week after the Packers’ game at St. Louis and felt a grabbing sensation in the injury.

“Red flags kind of went up,” Jennings said.

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