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Think before banning anything

8:35 PM, Jan. 9, 2013  |  Comments
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People talk about banning assault rifles, high-capacity magazines, and "military grade ammunition," and then have a vision that mass killings will go away. By the Geneva convention, military-grade ammunition is full-metal-jacketed ammunition just made to punch a hole in the enemy. It is nowhere as effective as hunting soft- or hollow-point hunting ammunition, which expands when it hits. With a little practice, a magazine can be switched out in about 1-2 seconds. If you count your ammunition, and always leave one in the chamber, you never have to recharge the weapon. With a little work, you make any weapon look like an assault weapon. That doesn't necessarily make it any deadlier. It just looks that way. A true assault weapon is select fire.

President Bill Clinton banned assault weapons and magazines before. These killings and crime did not go down. When the ban ran out, the rate of crime and mass killings did not go up. Politicians knew it then, and they know it now, banning them will not stop anything. There are other things that can be done that will work better than following the will of the media to ban things they don't like or understand.

Stephen Francies

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