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Check it out: Rhyming read-alouds

5:45 PM, Jan. 25, 2013  |  Comments
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This week, you and your child can celebrating rhyming, an important literacy skill that is challenging for young children. Quality rhyming read-alouds have a smooth rhythm that feels natural when spoken. Susan Shea's distinctive picture book "Do You Know Which Ones Will Grow" teaches rhyming as well as the difference between inanimate and animate objects. "If a duckling grows and becomes a duck/Can a car grow and become a ?truck?" While guessing the rhyming word to finish each bemusing riddle, a child's knowledge is tested in a creative way. Vibrant illustrations complement the zany tone.

Reading a rhyming book together is one of many activities listed as part of Brown County Library's "Dream Big" Early Literacy Challenge for newborns to 5-year-old children and their adults. Ask for a "Dream Big" folder at any Brown County Library, and you will receive five lists of simple, free and playful activities you can do to help young children build language and pre-reading skills. Complete your choice of six activities on a sheet and turn in your lists by March 15 for a chance to win prizes.

Basic Rhymes (toddler-PreK)

"Each Peach Pear Plum"

This sprightly little classic is a literary "I Spy" for young children, who will delight in looking for nursery rhyme characters among the enchanting illustrations of orchards, cupboards, and bucolic fields. By Janet Ahlberg

"Moonlight"

Simple but spellbinding poetry, along with dreamy illustrations, sets this bedtime book apart. A bunny watches as the moonlight "butters every tree, sucks at twigs and branches like a butter bee" and even enchants his dreams. By Helen Griffith

"Piggy-Pie-Po"

Three very short stories about a pig going about his day with eagerness and flair. Perfect for toddlers who will recognize the adventure in bath time, discovering new foods, and getting dressed. By Audrey Wood

"The Belly Book" by Fran Manushkin

"Bugs Galore" by Peter Stein

"Cars Galore" by Peter Stein

"Cock-A-Doodle-Who?" by Martine Perrin

"A Dog is a Dog" by Stephen Shaskan

"Down by the Bay" by Raffi

"Duck Sock Hop" by Jane Kohuth

"Frog in the Bog" by Karma Wilson

"Goodnight, Goodnight Construction Site" by Sherri Rinker

"Goodnight Moon" by Margaret Wise Brown

"Has Anyone Seen My Emily Greene?" by Norma Fox Mazer

"I Ain't Gonna Paint No More" by Karen Beaumont

"I Like Cats" by Patricia Hubbell

"Is Your Mama a Llama?" by Deborah Guarino

"Five Little Monkeys" (series) by Eileen Christelow

"Jamberry" by Bruce Degen

"Llama, Llama" (series) by Anna Dewdney

"The Man from the Land of Fandango" by Margaret Mahy

"Mice" by Rose Fyleman

"Mrs. McNosh Hangs Up her Wash" by Sarah Weeks

"My Farm Friends" by Wendell Minor

"My Truck is Stuck" by Kevin Lewis

"Noni the Pony" by Alison Lester

"Oink-A-Doodle-Moo" by Jef Czekaj

"One Duck Stuck" by Phyllis Root

"One Two That Is My Shoe!" by Alison Murray

"Rhyming Dust Bunnies" by Jan Thomas

"Silly Sally" by Audrey Wood

"Ten Tiny Toes" by Todd Tarpley

"This is Silly!" by Gary Taxali

"To Market, To Market" by Anne Miranda

"What Can a Crane Pick Up?" by Rebecca Dotlich

"Where is Tippy Toes?" by Betsy Lewin

"Wiggle" by Doreen Cronin

More Advanced Rhymes (K-2)

"Billy and Milly, Short and Silly"

Billy and Milly star in 13 "short stories," which are actually sets of rhymes with each concept illustrated by the two intrepid grade-schoolers. For example, "ape, cape, escape" shows Millie visiting an ape's cage at the zoo, and giving the primate a cape, which allows him to escape like a superhero by flying through the roof. This creative concept could be used by teachers for creative writing prompts. By Eve Feldman

"LMNO Peas"

This boisterous alphabet book teaches not only rhyme but occupations both familiar and fanciful, using sprightly green peas. Readers will be dazzled by expressive peas piloting, voting, and of course reading, all the while integrating the featured letter amidst the jubilee. By Keith Baker

"What is Your Dog Doing?"

Whatever your dog might be doing, the dogs in Singer's book will teach young readers new vocabulary words such as "scheming, "disgraced" and "chauffeured." The illustrations present witty visual clues as to the meanings of each exuberant rhyme. By Marilyn Singer

"Bebe Goes to the Beach"/"Bebe Goes Shopping" by Susan Elya

"Bubble Trouble" by Margaret Mahy

"Camping Day"/"Rainy Day"/"Snow Day" by Patricia Lakin

"Class Two at the Zoo" by Julia Jarman

"The Day We Danced in Underpants" by Sarah Wilson

"The Donut Chef" by Bob Staake

"The Duchess Bakes a Cake" by Virginia Kahl

"Falling for Rapunzel"/"Waking Beauty" by Leah Wilcox

"Fox in Socks" by Dr. Seuss

"A Giraffe and a Half" by Shel Silverstein

"Green Eggs and Ham" by Dr. Seuss

"The Gruffalo" by Julie Donaldson

"How Do Dinosaurs"?(series) by Jane Yolen

"If I Built a Car"/"If I Built a House" by Chris Van Dusen

"I Like Old Clothes" by Mary Ann Hoberman

"Light Up the Night" by Jean Reidy

"Look! A Book!" by Bob Staake

"Market Day" by Carol Cordsen

"Miss Lina's Ballerinas" (series) by Grace Maccarone

"Mr. Brown Can Moo! Can You?" by Dr. Seuss

"Mr.Magee" (series) by Chris Van Dusen

"Rena and Rio Build a Rhyme" (non-fiction) by Pamela Hall

"Sheep on a Ship"/ "Sheep in a Jeep" by Nancy Hall

"The Snail and the Whale" by Julie Donaldson

"Think Big!" by Elizabeth Scanlon

"The Three Ninja Pigs" by Corey Schwartz

"Tumford the Terrible" by Nancy Tillman

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