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Ashes to ashes: How Green Bay observes Lent

7:24 AM, Feb. 14, 2013
Diane Vanderheiden administers ashes to Marilyn Enright during Ash Wednesday services at St. Wiilebrord Catholic Church in downtown Green Bay.
Diane Vanderheiden administers ashes to Marilyn Enright during Ash Wednesday services at St. Wiilebrord Catholic Church in downtown Green Bay.
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Ash Wednesday is all about creating a mindset for Trisha Pickard.

The 25-year-old, who works at Freedom House, attended Mass to start Lent at St. Willebrod Parish, 209 South Adams Street. Ashes are placed on the foreheads of Catholics during Mass in keeping with ancient practice and as a symbol of the dependence on God's mercy and forgiveness.

"Going to the Mass, it's a more actualization to the start of Lent, it gets you in the true mindset of what Lent is about," she said. "I get closer to god in this time." ...

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If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

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