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Study: Kids' behavior improves with better TV content

Time with tube didn't decrease but aggression, difficulty did

6:15 PM, Feb. 19, 2013
Study participant Nancy Jensen looks on as her son, Joe, 2, is given a special treat of a little TV time.
Study participant Nancy Jensen looks on as her son, Joe, 2, is given a special treat of a little TV time.
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Being choosy when it comes to the television shows preschoolers watch affects their behavior - even if the amount of time they spend watching isn't reduced, a study finds.

In one of the largest studies yet to examine how modifying television content affects the development of young children ages 3 to 5, researchers report that six months after families reduced their kids' exposure to aggressive and violence-filled programming and increased exposure to enriching and educational programming - even without changing the number of viewing hours - kids demonstrated statistically ...

What's your take on the Packers Family Night change?

Retrieving results.
Watching practice is fine.(Your vote)
15%
576 votes
I'd rather watch a scrimmage.(Your vote)
23%
856 votes
I don't want to pay to watch practice.(Your vote)
27%
1017 votes
It doesn't matter to me.(Your vote)
34%
1271 votes

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If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

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