Advertisement

You will be redirected to the page you want to view in  seconds.

Muskogee (Okla.) Phoenix on knives on planes

9:04 PM, Mar. 16, 2013  |  Comments
  • Filed Under

Dropping our guard again can't become the legacy of the 9/11 terror attacks.

The Transportation Security Administration's decision to let passengers carry pocketknives on flights unnecessarily rolls back protections designed to keep 9/11 from happening again.

Terrorists used simple box cutters to take over planes and crash them into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon in 2001.

Now the TSA will allow smaller pocketknives - blades less than 2.36 inches long and less than half an inch wide - on planes.

The TSA policy aligns the United States with international standards and allows the TSA to concentrate on more serious safety threats, the agency said.

Terrorists count on people letting down their guard because they don't like the inconvenience of being diligent.

Many of the things that are banned for carry-on are acceptable to be in luggage kept in the plane's cargo hold.

Anyone who is surprised by having a pocketknife seized has not been paying attention for the last 12 years.

Keeping terrorists off planes is an affirmation of passengers' rights.

What's your take on the Packers Family Night change?

Retrieving results.
Watching practice is fine.(Your vote)
15%
574 votes
I'd rather watch a scrimmage.(Your vote)
23%
856 votes
I don't want to pay to watch practice.(Your vote)
27%
1014 votes
It doesn't matter to me.(Your vote)
34%
1271 votes

Catch up on the latest in our pregame show every game day.

Football fans

If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

Special Reports

ORDER YOURS

Football fans

If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

Special Reports