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Low water levels hurt Great Lakes shippers' bottom line

Carriers forced to lighten loads

7:14 AM, Mar. 29, 2013
The limestone carrier Lewis J. Kuber and the tanker Sichem Onomichi (background) are docked in the port of Green Bay last October.
The limestone carrier Lewis J. Kuber and the tanker Sichem Onomichi (background) are docked in the port of Green Bay last October.
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Faced with low water levels, shippers on the Great Lakes are being forced to leave anywhere between 9 percent to 15 percent of cargo dockside, industry experts say.

Lake levels, and ways help mitigate the impact on business, is a topic both shipping companies and the wider maritime industry in the region are working to get a handle on, said Ray Johnston, president of the Chamber of Marine Commerce. He made his comments Thursday at an annual port symposium in Green Bay.

"One of things we're looking at is what are all these economic impacts and what are the costs of low water?" he said during a ...

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