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Growing number express interest in gluten-free eating

8:54 PM, Mar. 29, 2013
Millions of people are buying gluten-free foods because they say they make them feel better, even if they don't have a wheat allergy.
Millions of people are buying gluten-free foods because they say they make them feel better, even if they don't have a wheat allergy.
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Perhaps with a boost from such celebrities as Miley Cyrus and Gwyneth Paltrow, the number of Americans showing interest in a gluten-free diet has reached new heights.

Almost a third of adults (29 percent) in the U.S. say they want to cut down on the gluten they eat or consume a gluten-free diet, according to new data from the NPD Group, a market research firm. The latest finding is based on interviews with 1,000 adults during the last week of January. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley.

That's the highest percentage since the company began asking the question in 2009. ...

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