Experts avoid sounding alarm on chemicals - but adjust their own habits

5:23 PM, Apr. 24, 2013
Concerns are growing about endocrine-disrupting chemicals in Lake Michigan, the Great Lakes and other surface waters. While eating too much contaminated fish is risky, experts stop short of advising people to avoid swimming or other contact with the water.
Concerns are growing about endocrine-disrupting chemicals in Lake Michigan, the Great Lakes and other surface waters. While eating too much contaminated fish is risky, experts stop short of advising people to avoid swimming or other contact with the water.
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Federal and state governments have issued scant guidance on the risks hormone-disrupting chemicals pose to people, but University of Wisconsin-Madison pediatric endocrinologist Ellen Connor is not waiting for an official verdict.

To protect her children, Connor has thrown out all her old plastic containers that likely contain suspected endocrine disruptors. She uses fresh vegetables to avoid the chemicals in the can linings. She microwaves things in glassware rather than plastic. She reads the labels on hand soap.

"My kids, I try to limit their exposure," Connor said. ...

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