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In depression, body's clock is disrupted, study finds

1:11 AM, May 16, 2013
A recent study shows a link between a disruption in the brain's daily gene activity and depression. This disruption might help explain why irregular sleep patterns are common in depression.
A recent study shows a link between a disruption in the brain's daily gene activity and depression. This disruption might help explain why irregular sleep patterns are common in depression.
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Just like you, the genes in your brain follow a daily routine. But that natural rhythm may be thrown off in people with depression, a new study suggests.

Researchers say the findings shed new light on what goes wrong in the brain when depression strikes. And they hope the results, published online May 13 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could spur new therapies down the road.

It has long been known that body processes follow daily circadian rhythms, and that the "master clock" orchestrating it all exists in the brain. That clock mainly responds to light and ...

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