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Uncommon Artistry: Wooden Decoys

1:38 PM, Aug. 16, 2013
Two duck hunters, circa 1895. Identified as Fred Luhm (right) and 'Char' on left.
Two duck hunters, circa 1895. Identified as Fred Luhm (right) and 'Char' on left.
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Autumn will soon be here.

As the days grow shorter and the air chills, many people start to think of duck hunting, a sport enjoyed by generations of residents. The diverse heritage of the region includes the unique practice of using hand-carved wooden decoys, admired as art and as a tangible link to our sporting legacy.

The vast wetlands of the region formed ideal habitat for ducks. Wild rice, wild celery, duckweed, pickerelweed, and other aquatic plants provided a plentiful source of food and perfect nesting sites. Waterfowl flourished, and great flocks darkened the sky every spring and ...

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If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

Special Reports