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Crossroads at Big Creek: Insects find different ways, reasons to drink up

2:56 PM, Aug. 20, 2013
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Hikers and runners who exercise at Crossroads at Big Creek often stop by the Collins Learning Center. Our bubbler boasts very cold water and, after spending time in the sun, our visitors are thirsty.

So are our insects. Take bees. They expend a great deal of energy while foraging. To get hydrated, they have special mouth parts which form a tube, surrounding a hair-covered tongue shaped much like a spoon.

A bee can extend its tongue more than a quarter inch. By moving the tongue up and down in the mouth-tube, the bee laps up the sweet nectar from a flower. If they are thirsty, bees might dip into a ...

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If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

Special Reports