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Wallace hopes experience can complement Rodgers

Sep. 6, 2013
 
Seneca Wallace warms up before a preseason game with the Cleveland Browns against the Green Bay Packers at Lambeau Field on Aug. 16, 2012. The Browns defeated the Packers 35-10.
Seneca Wallace warms up before a preseason game with the Cleveland Browns against the Green Bay Packers at Lambeau Field on Aug. 16, 2012. The Browns defeated the Packers 35-10. / Getty Images

Seneca Wallace hasn’t had much time to celebrate landing back on an NFL in-season roster after a one year sabbatical.

Four days into his tenure as the Green Bay Packers’ backup quarterback, the 33-year-old veteran has been too busy acclimating himself to his fourth new playbook in a little more than a year.

After being released by Cleveland at the end of the training camp last August, Wallace picked up quick offseason jobs with New Orleans and San Francisco before landing with the Packers after Vince Young, Graham Harrell and B.J. Coleman all floundered in the preseason.

Now, Wallace has been keeping his head in his iPad playbook and mentally preparing for being Aaron Rodgers’ second set of eyes when the team travels to San Francisco on 49ers.

“You’re looking for tendencies,” said Wallace, who came into the NFL in 2003. “Maybe some of the things verbally I might hear from the defense. Certain checks and things like that that they might get to depending on what he does offensively. Any little subtle thing you can pick up on, it’s going to be able to help him out. It can be the difference between a big play and a bad play. Just staying in tune to the game and helping out any way I can.”

Wallace came into the league in 2003 with Seattle and was the backup to former Packers quarterback Matt Hasselbeck for several years before being traded to Cleveland in 2010.

He still isn’t an expert at the playbook, but his history in the West Coast offense has served as a Rosetta stone for understanding McCarthy’s lingo.

The one thing Wallace has no question about is his experience. As the oldest player in the Packers’ locker room, his ability to read opposing defenses and filter their signals onto the starting quarterback has been his calling card.

After spending the past year out of football, there’s no place Wallace would rather be.

“It’s exciting to get back to game week being out last year,” Wallace said. “It was very humbling to be away from the game and you see what goes on during the week. Sitting at home and watching it on TV is not fun. It puts it in perspective and I’m glad to be back.”

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