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Experts say simple strategies aren't always enough for bedwetting

3:49 PM, Sep. 11, 2013
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While techniques such as fluid restriction can help some children who have problems with bedwetting, alarms and medications are more effective, a new study finds.

"Simple behavioral therapies such as rewarding the child for dry nights or taking the child to the toilet during the night can sometimes help with bedwetting, and is better than doing nothing," said study leader Dr. Patrina Caldwell, a pediatrician at the Children's Hospital at Westmead and senior lecturer at the University of Sydney, in Australia.

"However, there are more effective treatments such as bedwetting alarm ...

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If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

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