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Train your brain

Do puzzles, apps and games really help improve function of the body's most complex organ?

11:30 AM, Nov. 28, 2013
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If you've ever felt drained after doing a crossword puzzle, working a math problem or taking a test, there's a reason, says Dr. Paul Foster, professor of clinical psychology at Middle Tennessee State University and a practicing psychologist at Murfreesboro Medical Clinic.

"There is an idea out there that you have a process of cognitive fatigue that is similar to physical fatigue. If you're exercising, you get tired. If you're using your brain, it feels tired," Foster says.

The fatigue occurs likely because of a physiological process. ...

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If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

Special Reports