Advertisement

You will be redirected to the page you want to view in  seconds.

Cowboys' Romo can relate to Rodgers' broken collarbone

Dec. 11, 2013
 
Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo (9) makes a pass in the fourth quarter over Green Bay Packers defensive tackle Johnny Jolly (97) during a Sept. 21, 2008, game at Lambeau Field. File/Gannett Wisconsin Media
Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo (9) makes a pass in the fourth quarter over Green Bay Packers defensive tackle Johnny Jolly (97) during a Sept. 21, 2008, game at Lambeau Field. File/Gannett Wisconsin Media

Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo knows all about broken collarbones and can relate to what the Packers’ Aaron Rodgers is going through.

Romo broke his left clavicle, the same as Rodgers, in Week 6 of the 2010 season and missed the final 10 games.

Romo said it’s tricky to determine exactly when to come back from such an injury.

“It’s very difficult,” Romo said in a conference call with Wisconsin reporters today.
“The discomfort and if you’re feeling it at all, you can’t come back and play. But even moreso than that, even when you get relatively where you feel like it’s pain free, it still doesn’t mean you’re ready to play just because it’s such an easy thing to hurt again and it’s a little different in the sense that if you come back right when you feel like you’re healthy, there’s just so many cases of people come down with another collarbone injury, the same one just re-injuring it. That really plays a big role in determining when you come back, and always an injury that you almost have to wait longer than initially diagnosed, typically because it’s just the re-injury factor alone plays such a high role.”

Romo said his collarbone was displaced, meaning it was a bad break. He was initially told it would take between six and eight weeks to heal.

“I had a pretty good size break, it took a good 10 weeks on mine before I felt really you could do what you wanted to do,” said Romo. “From that standpoint, each one might be a little bit different though.”

The Cowboys were out playoff contention so the urgency for Romo to return didn’t exist in 2010.

“I think in our case a lot of it was dependent upon where we were and what position we were in and if we had the opportunity to continue to play,” said Romo. “We didn’t that year so it made the decision easier on the doctors, I think. I was doing everything I could to get back out there. I know Aaron’s doing the same thing. You also have to be smart about it. If he’s been feeling good for a couple of weeks then I think that’s something where you could really have a chance to say his re-injury factor has gone down and if that’s the case you might be able to go.”

About this blog

Get Green Bay Packers updates as they happen from our reporting team: (from left) Mike Vandermause, Wes Hodkiewicz and Pete Dougherty.

What's your take on the Packers Family Night change?

Retrieving results.
Watching practice is fine.(Your vote)
15%
575 votes
I'd rather watch a scrimmage.(Your vote)
23%
856 votes
I don't want to pay to watch practice.(Your vote)
27%
1017 votes
It doesn't matter to me.(Your vote)
34%
1271 votes

Catch up on the latest in our pregame show every game day.

Football fans

If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

Special Reports

ORDER YOURS

Football fans

If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

Special Reports