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Your Letters: Feb. 12

9:59 PM, Feb. 11, 2014  |  Comments
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It's more likely we just disagree

I want to respond to a letter to the editor that was written recently claiming that Republicans are heartless and only for the rich - and pretty much hate kids, poor people, old people, middle-class people - basically anyone who isn't filthy rich.

I found the letter to be extremely disingenuous. Now I don't always agree with Republicans and I can agree with Democrats on a few things. But how about we just have different ideas about what is really best for America and what will really help people out of poverty? How about we look back at what the Founding Fathers stood for?

Government is not the only way to help people, and yet it's looked at as THE solution to everything. I just believe that there are better ways to help people than more big intrusive government. Let's have a real conversation based on the real effects of certain policies instead of using highly charged rhetoric and generalizations.

Most conservatives are fine with a safety net - something temporary, not a lifestyle. Unemployment is and should be temporary. Food stamps should be temporary. Welfare in general should be temporary. I'm fine with helping people temporarily while they get back on their feet.

But it is a sad day when 47 million people are on food stamps in this country. Is this the American dream? Is this something to brag about? You mean to tell me the economy is doing well? The better the economy is doing, the fewer people we should have on welfare.

The liberal ideology says that the more people that are dependent on government, the better. The American dream should not be for the poor to feel trapped in poverty and kept dependent on government. That is not freedom.

The inner cities are full of people trapped in poverty, and yet some brag about all the ways we are helping these people. Really? It seems depressing to me. Some children are stuck in failing public schools with no other choice. I'd like to think that welfare is intended to help people reach for something greater. But rarely does that happen.

As conservatives we believe that overly intrusive government keeps people from reaching their God-given potential as well as stifles economic growth and makes it harder for people to find good jobs that can help support their families. Look at Detroit - look who has governed there for 50-plus years. Look at the political corruption. Look at the results of overtaxation and overregulation. Poverty has overtaken that once great city and left it in shambles.

Higher taxes and more regulations don't hurt corporations as much as they hurt smaller business owners. There are plenty of politicians on both sides that buddy up with corporations through crony capitalism - you scratch my back I'll scratch yours. How about we lower the tax rates and get rid of many of the loopholes that only benefit large corporations and let's make it more fair for smaller businesses.

And when you raise taxes on businesses it just gets passed on down to the consumers - hurting "the little guy." Should we have some oversight? Of course, but within reason. You want more revenue? How about a booming economy that puts more people back to work and helps them be more independent (and less dependent on government)?

Some liberal ideas may have good intentions, but there are many unintended consequences that actually do more harm than good when these policies are put in place. It seems there is far too much trust in government to do a good job at running our lives, which many in government feel the need to do. Keep in mind that the larger and more intrusive the federal government gets, the harder it is to keep those in government accountable and keep the corruption out.

I'm willing to debate people on issues as long as they are willing to stop demonizing and making assumptions about people's intentions when at least half the country now thinks we are going in the wrong direction.

Stephanie Soucek

Sturgeon Bay

Disappointing store designs

We just received the Jan. 22 issue of the Door County Advocate and have seen the horrible designs submitted for the CVS pharmacy building. As Holly Feldman is quoted as saying, "The whole corner is a hodgepodge." Does the CVS design correct the problem or just add to it?

All three designs are completely out of character for Door County. The three designs belong in a cheap Southern California strip mall.

I often think the people of Door County forget why tourists like to visit the area. They don't have to leave home to see more strip malls.

Door County has been called the "Cape Cod of the Midwest." I doubt the CVS design would be approved for one of the main streets of Cape Cod.

Thomas R. Kenney

Poway, Calif.

Critics ignore Southern Door's excellence

There is a name for individuals who relentlessly and anonymously attack people of goodwill: Gutless Wonders. Does anyone truly believe there is no connection between the bogus "Southern Door" website designed to spread untruths and innuendo in an attempt to kill the referendum effort and the bogus "B4 Southern Door" website aimed to undermine a group wishing to promote the positive aspects of their local school district?

Do you really believe there is no nexus between those individuals and the threatening and harassing emails sent to the administrators, school board members and community members whose intent is to demonstrate and focus attention on the excellent performance of the district's students and staff? Come on, man!

Why some people can't see the absolutely wonderful things going on in the Southern Door County School District is beyond me. When I worked in the district, PRIDE exuded from those working in the schools and from those who supported the schools that their community's children attended.

The ongoing turmoil in the district caused me to attend the Nov. 18 Board of Education Meeting. I went specifically to see if the PRIDE remained. I am happy to report that it does in many, many ways - Jessica Meacham, first-grade teacher, was named Wisconsin Rural Teacher of the Year. Fall into Books, the Haunted House and the veterans assembly were examples of the high degree of volunteerism and community engagement in the schools.

And Southern Door continues to offer a wide array of courses and extracurricular activities in music, athletics and the arts for its students as evidenced by athletic conference award winners, the high school musical "Grease." student participation in Mini-Business World and the new high school STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) class.

The school district report card showed Southern Door was No. 1 in CESA 7 and 16th in the state (2013); Southern Door High School was cited by U.S. News & World Report as one of 14 top schools in the state (2012) and received a Bronze award (2013); Southern Door Middle School was recognized by the administrators association for reading and math achievement (2011, 2012); and Southern Door Elementary School achieved the Department of Public Instruction's "reward" as top Title I school in state (2013).

And have you looked at student achievement and engagement data on the DPI's WISEdash Public to view the dashboards for Southern Door students? Go to http://wise.dpi.wi.gov/wisedash. You will be impressed when you conduct side-by-side comparisons of Southern Door student performance with those in the state or with those school districts in their athletic conference. And students with disabilities are outperforming their peers as well!

Isn't the ultimate goal of a school district to provide those educational opportunities in which its children can excel? It appears to me that Southern Door is doing just that. But there are Gutless Wonders who are attempting to undermine that PRIDE. You must not let them have it!

Jesse Harness

Dyckesville

The last New York NFL championship

Fans may interested in knowing that the last time a National Football League championship game was played in New York, it was between the Green Bay Packers and the New York Giants.

That was before Super Bowl, and the game was played on Dec. 30, 1962, at Yankee Stadium, with the Packers winning 16-7.

At that time, the NFL championships were between the Eastern Conference winners (Giants) and the Western Conference winners (Packers).

It was the Packers' second straight national title under coach Vince Lombardi, who before coming to Green Bay had played and coached for the Giants. So it was also a nice homecoming for him.

The weather turned out to suit Super Bowl XLVIII, but back in 1962 it was another historical "Ice Bowl," as temperatures never got above 13 degrees during the game.

Fans never really stayed in their seats, standing up mostly to help keep warm besides rooting for their teams.

In fact, it would also be the last time an NFL Championship would be played in New York City. The recent Super Bowl was of course was played across the Hudson River, in East Rutherford, N.J., at MetLife Stadium, where both the Giants and the New York Jets call home.

Packers great Paul Hornung said of the 1962 game that it was the toughest game he ever played.

Garry Peterson

Sturgeon Bay

What's your take on the Packers Family Night change?

Retrieving results.
Watching practice is fine.(Your vote)
15%
575 votes
I'd rather watch a scrimmage.(Your vote)
23%
856 votes
I don't want to pay to watch practice.(Your vote)
27%
1017 votes
It doesn't matter to me.(Your vote)
34%
1271 votes

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Football fans

If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

Special Reports