Advertisement

You will be redirected to the page you want to view in  seconds.

Email, phone, text to stay in touch with library

2:54 PM, Feb. 21, 2014  |  Comments
T.B. Scott Free Library assistant Ruthann Dunphy awaits the next patron at the circulation desk, where hundreds of books requested by patrons are always ready for pickup.
T.B. Scott Free Library assistant Ruthann Dunphy awaits the next patron at the circulation desk, where hundreds of books requested by patrons are always ready for pickup.
  • Filed Under

T.B. Scott Free Library may need to contact you about what you've checked out or what you want to check out. More specifically, we contact you when:

1. Something you've requested is ready to pick up ("hold notices").

2. Something you've checked out is coming due, so you know to renew or return it soon ("courtesy notices").

3. Something you've checked out is overdue and needs to be renewed or returned immediately ("overdue notices," sent 10 days, 31 days, and eight weeks after an item's due date).

You can choose from several ways for the library to notify you:

Email

You can receive hold, courtesy and overdue notices by email. You may need to "train" your email account that emails from the library are OK. Check your email spam and trash folders until you're sure library messages are coming through. It usually takes only a few times to train your account.

Phone

You can receive hold and overdue notices by phone, though not courtesy notices. You get automated message calls and voicemail messages if you don't answer. Don't fret when your caller ID shows a Wausau phone call; that's the location of Wisconsin Valley Library Service, to which T.B. Scott Library belongs. The automated phone call doesn't give a title, to protect your privacy in case someone else listens to the message.

Postal mail

You can receive hold and overdue notices by postal mail, though not courtesy notices. Postal mail is the default method unless you choose another one. Because postal mail is slowest for you, and the most expensive for the library, patrons have been encouraged to choose alternatives if possible.

Text messaging

You can receive hold, courtesy and overdue notices by text message (never while driving, please!). You'll need to log into your V-Cat (our online library catalog) account and specifically opt in to choose text messaging. If you use text messaging notification, your cell provider may charge, depending on your service plan. You'll get a separate text for each item, so if you use the library frequently, you might generate a lot of text traffic.

Notifying juveniles

Any change in notification method for a juvenile's (age 17 or younger) library card needs to be requested by that patron's parent or legal guardian.

The Internet

Request items from our collection by searching the V-Cat library catalog. Go to our website at www.tbscottlibrary.org to log in. You can create lists of items to request now or later, and even have V-Cat keep a history of what you've read, to help manage your reading list!

Check out our Facebook page (TB Scott Library), or follow us on Twitter (@TBLibrary) to keep up with what's happening at the library. You're also welcome to stop by in person or give us a call at 715-536-7191 with questions. Let us know how we can help you enjoy your library better.

What's your take on the Packers Family Night change?

Retrieving results.
Watching practice is fine.(Your vote)
15%
575 votes
I'd rather watch a scrimmage.(Your vote)
23%
856 votes
I don't want to pay to watch practice.(Your vote)
27%
1017 votes
It doesn't matter to me.(Your vote)
34%
1271 votes

Catch up on the latest in our pregame show every game day.

Football fans

If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

Special Reports

ORDER YOURS

Football fans

If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

Special Reports