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Handwriting lovers work to keep cursive alive in schools

4:24 PM, May 7, 2014
Lori Bychinski, an eighth-grade English teacher at D.C. Everest Junior High School, mourns the loss of cursive handwriting.
Lori Bychinski, an eighth-grade English teacher at D.C. Everest Junior High School, mourns the loss of cursive handwriting.
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If something needs to be handwritten at D.C. Everest Junior High School, staff members know to turn to eighth-grade English teacher Lori Bychinski.

"She's got the best handwriting in school," her colleague, social studies teacher Christian Ammon, said during the school's History Day Fair in February. "Anytime we need something written by hand, we come to her."

Bychinski laughs at the idea of being the handwriting guru, but she's proud of it, too. Her students might roll their eyes when she suggests that they should take care of their cursive writing skills, but she loves to see sentences ...

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