Advertisement

You will be redirected to the page you want to view in  seconds.

More teachers grouping kids by ability

Survey finds number of fourth-graders placed in reading circles skyrockted

5:23 PM, Mar. 18, 2013
Third-grade teacher Jeni Bridges instructs student Leonardo Elorza while his classmate Judith Perez works on an assignment at R.E. Good Elementary School in Carrollton, Texas, on Aug. 30
Third-grade teacher Jeni Bridges instructs student Leonardo Elorza while his classmate Judith Perez works on an assignment at R.E. Good Elementary School in Carrollton, Texas, on Aug. 30
  • Filed Under

New findings based on more than 20 years of research suggest that despite decades of controversy, elementary school teachers now feel fine placing students in "ability groups."

The research, out Monday from the centrist Brookings Institution's Brown Center on American Education, finds that between 1998 and 2009, the percentage of fourth-grade teachers who said they created ability-based reading groups skyrocketed from 28 percent to 71 percent.

In math, between 1996 and 2011, the practice rose from 40 percent to 61 percent. The practice remained fairly constant in eighth-grade math, ...

What's your take on the Packers Family Night change?

Retrieving results.
Watching practice is fine.(Your vote)
15%
574 votes
I'd rather watch a scrimmage.(Your vote)
23%
856 votes
I don't want to pay to watch practice.(Your vote)
27%
1015 votes
It doesn't matter to me.(Your vote)
34%
1271 votes

Catch up on the latest in our pregame show every game day.

Football fans

If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

Special Reports

ORDER YOURS

Football fans

If you've ever answered "Who has the ball?" with "It's halftime," you might recognize The Airhead. Check out the characters in our cartoon gallery of oddball fans.

Special Reports