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Pro Football Focus uses a complex system to analyze every NFL player involved in every snap in every game and assigns a grade based on how he performed on that play, with each position having its own set of grading guidelines. Plus/minus scores are given in 0.5 increments and a small normalization factor is applied to make 0.0 the average grade for a game or season. To learn more, visit www.profootballfocus.com.

Although Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers led the NFL with 1,613 yards entering Week 6, his receivers were responsible for a league-high 62.9 percent of that yardage gained after the catch.

The Chargers’ passing game keeps things short and in the middle of the field, with 51 percent of Rivers' attempts targeting receivers between the numbers and under nine yards. It's a major reason that his PFF accuracy percentage of 82.4 leads the league (Tom Brady is second at 81.0; Aaron Rodgers is fourth at 79.4).

Only 7.4 percent of Rivers’ passes travel more than 20 yards — among the lowest rate in the league (in contrast to Jaguars quarterback Blake Bortles’ 19.0 percent), but when he does throw deep, his 57.1 percent PFF accuracy is among the league’s best.

The route profile for Rivers’ receivers reflects that short passing game, with 22 percent of his attempts targeting hitch routes (vs. the NFL average of 14 percent) and 18 percent targeting crossing routes (11 percent being the NFL average).

Defenses blitz Rivers on 33 percent of his drop backs, but he makes them pay — only four sacks and a 121.6 passer rating when blitzed.

PFF Accuracy Percentage = (Completions + Drops) / Attempts - (Throw-Aways + Spikes + Batted Passes + Hit As Thrown).