LINKEDINCOMMENTMORE

ATLANTA - Green Bay Packers wide receiver Ty Montgomery was inactive against the Atlanta Falcons with an illness he does not believe will influence his ability to play football moving forward.

The illness, according to a report from ESPN, is a kidney-related problem. The report went on to say Montgomery "observed blood in his urine" after a tough hit in last week's win over the Chicago Bears.

A league source told the Journal Sentinel and PackersNews that the decision to hold him out of Sunday's game was precautionary.

"I don’t want to go into too much detail," Montgomery said in the locker room after the game. "I want to try to keep it as personal as possible."

MCGINNRodgers can't deliver in the end

DOUGHERTYPackers flinch in crunch time

RELATEDPackers wing it on offense

INSIDERThumbs down to pass rush

BOX SCOREFalcons 33, Packers 32

When Montgomery was made aware of the ESPN report, he said the information could not be denied.

"Like I said, I don’t want to go into too much detail," Montgomery said. "You know everything gets somehow related to the sickle cell trait. Fortunately, not everybody experiences symptoms. Unfortunately, I had to deal with some of those symptoms and I’m just taking it day by day."

Montgomery said the team monitored his status throughout the week with the hope that he would be available against the Falcons. He was on the field with his teammates during warmups and watched the game from the sideline.

There is no concern, Montgomery said, of a long-term issue on or off the field.

RELATED'Back to drawing board' for 'D'

RELATEDYoung WRs respond to challenge

RELATEDGunter 'left one out there'

RELATEDSocial media uncovers profane Allison tweets

Without him, the Packers once again used a running back by committee approach: Fullback Aaron Ripkowski had six carries for 34 yards; running back Don Jackson had four carries for 10 yards; newcomer Knile Davis had three carries for 4 yards.

The leading rusher, though, was quarterback Aaron Rodgers, who scrambled his way to 60 yards and a number of crucial first downs.

LINKEDINCOMMENTMORE