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Walkthrough: Breakdown of Daniels' contract

Weston Hodkiewicz
USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin
Green Bay Packers defensive tackle Mike Daniels looks on during training camp practice at Ray Nitschke Field on Saturday, Aug. 15, 2015.

Each Wednesday, Weston Hodkiewicz provides an inside look at the Green Bay Packers in his Walkthrough blog.

Mike Daniels will count an additional $2.4 million against the Green Bay Packers’ 2015 salary cap after agreeing to a four-year, $41 million extension earlier this week, according to a source with access to the NFLPA salary database.

As has been customary in the past, general manager Ted Thompson and chief negotiator Russ Ball lessened the impact of the fourth-year defensive lineman’s hefty new contract by using the last year of his rookie contract to prorate his $12 million signing bonus over five seasons instead of four.

So Daniels, who already counted $1.542 million against this year’s cap, consumed only a small chunk of the $9,696,019 the Packers had remaining. The leftover $7,295,019 can be used to either re-sign any of the team’s other 14 upcoming free agents or can be carried over toward the 2016 cap.

While Daniels’ new contract averages $10.25 million per season in new money, the Packers were able to use the final year of his rookie contract to their benefit. Thompson and Ball used a similar formula in the past when extending quarterback Aaron Rodgers, receiver Jordy Nelson, safety Morgan Burnett and linebacker Clay Matthews.

Daniels, 26, will make $17 million through the 2016 season. He can earn $8 million in 2017, $7.5 million in 2018 and $8.5 million in 2019 in addition to potential escalators. His base salary rockets from $2.1 million in 2017 to $6.6 million in 2018 and $7.6 million in 2019.

The contract calls for $3.3 million and $5 million offseason roster bonuses due on the third day of the league year in 2016 and 2017, respectively. Each year of the contract has a $400,000 workout bonus and $500,000 roster bonus that’s paid out in increments of $31,250 for every game he’s active.

His cap numbers are $4,022,996 in 2015, $7.4 million in 2016, $10.4 million in 2017, $9.9 in 2018 and $10.9 million in 2019.

The deal includes Pro Bowl escalators of $125,000 after each year of the deal. He can earn an additional $500,000 in the final two seasons if he hits escalators based on either playing time or sacks plus playoffs. Daniels will earn $42.5 million if he plays out the contract and hits all of his incentives.

If the Packers hold firm with their current roster, they have a little more than $130 million tied up in contracts for 2016. Early estimates are the 2016 cap will be roughly $153 million in addition to whatever funds teams carry over from the previous season.

Here’s a full breakdown of Daniels’ contract:

2015

Cash value: $13,547,850

Salary-cap charge: $4,022,996

Signing bonus: $12 million

Base salary: $1.542 million

Workout bonus: $5,850

2016

Cash value: $5 million

Salary-cap charge: $7.4 million

Base salary: $800,000

Roster bonus: $3.3 million (due the third day of league year)

Roster bonus (per game): $500,000

Workout bonus: $400,000

2017

Cash value: $8 million

Salary-cap charge: $10.4 million

Base salary: $2.1 million

Roster bonus: $5 million (due the third day of the league year)

Roster bonus (per game): $500,000

Workout bonus: $400,000

2018

Cash value: $7.5 million

Salary-cap charge: $9.9 million

Base salary: $6.6 million

Roster bonus (per game): $500,000

Workout bous: $400,000

2019

Cash value: $8.5 million

Salary-cap charge: $10.9 million

Base salary: $7.6 million

Roster bonus (per game): $500,000

Workout bonus: $400,000